Thursday, October 18, 2018
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MOVIES BOLLYWOOD JIA AUR JIA

Jia Aur Jia

Jia Aur Jia is a Bollywood Drama movie directed by Howard Rosemeyer. Starring Kalki Koechlin,Richa Chaddha,Frank M. Ahearn,Andras Sunyi,Arslan Goni,Sol Roach,Badheka Harsh,Jessika Hellfalk,Konstantinos Vlastaras.


jia-aur-jia
Jia Aur Jia Cast / Crew
DIRECTOR: Howard Rosemeyer.
GENRE:Drama
PRODUCER:Mirza Askari,Sunil Bohra.
CINEMATOGRAPHER: Shakil A. Khan.
MUSIC DIRECTOR:,Nisschal Zaveri.
SINGERS:Smita Malhotra,Asees Kaur.
LYRICIST:Mudassar Aziz,Raqueeb Alam.
SCRIPT WRITER:Mudassar Aziz.
EDITOR:Sandeep Kurup.
CAST

Frank M. Ahearn

Andras Sunyi

Arslan Goni

Sol Roach

Badheka Harsh

Jessika Hellfalk

Konstantinos Vlastaras

Jia Aur Jia Review

'Jia Aur Jia': Lessons to learn (Review By Troy Ribeiro ;  Rating: **)

Debutant director Howard Rosemeyer's film, "Jia Aur Jia" has all the ingredients for a commercial film, but the mix is disproportionate. Between a road-movie and a chick-flick, the narrative traverses a bumpy path with a high dosage of emotional quotient.

The film is promising, but then the promise is shallow and vain. It is a tale of two "Jias" -- Jia Grewal (Kalki Koechlin) and Jia Venkatram (Richa Chadha) -- and it shows the contrasts in their perception of living their lives. Hence, the title "Jia Aur Jia" could loosely be translated into - 'live and lived'.

Used as metaphors, the bubbly Jia Grewal and the docile Jia Venkatram are two strangers who land up taking a budget trip inclusive of a road journey to Sweden. To simplify the confusion over their names during the holidays, Jia Grewal decides calling the other "Venkat", a short of her surname.

The duration of the trip is not revealed, so we are set for a happy-go-merry journey, where predictably the protagonists bond. And while they are bonding, it is revealed that like their characters, both have diametrically opposite objectives for this trip.

Unravelling of their objective is what keeps you glued to your seat, but in a rather tedious manner. That is because the film seems to have been inspired, intentionally or unintentionally, by other films.

Also, the writing is shallow and unconvincing. The plot is wrinkle free, switching moods violently.

The first half meanders aimlessly on an even keel, setting restlessness among the audience whereas the second half hooks you emotionally, albeit scarcely.

The dialogues, infused with filmy references are superficially dramatic making the entire procedure seem staged and unnatural. And the final message is far from being evocative.

While the characters are well-etched, the situations they are in seem to be one-dimensionally written, thereby marring their performances. Kalki's over-the-top act and Richa's forcefully understated performance, befit the characters they play. But they certainly seem out of tune with each other making their on-screen chemistry appear abnormal.

In his maiden appearance, Arslan Goni as Vasu is impressive and earnest. He has a fairly amiable screen presence, but his act fizzles out due to the poor writing and handling of his scenes.

Zarina Wahab as Jia Grewal's mother and Sudhanshu Pandey as Venkat's husband are flat characters and wasted.

On the technical front, with a shoe-string budget, the film has modest production values. The landscapes in Sweden are exploited with flourish but Shakil A. Khan's camerawork fails to elevate the viewing experience. While his frames are picture perfect, a few of the visuals are heavily pixilated.

The songs and the background score seamlessly mesh with the narrative but they do not add any sparkle.

Overall, this film befits for television viewing.


'Jia Aur Jia': Old-fashioned but effective (Review By Subhash K. Jha ; Rating: *** )

Why should boys have all the fun? Just the sheer pleasure of watching two of our feistiest actresses in a road movie set in Sweden is enough of a kickback to sail through what is at best a girl-bonding flick with plenty of perk and pizzazz, thanks to the crackling and hissing chemistry between the two lead actresses.

The basic premise is promising. Two very dissimilar girls share the same name and nothing else. Kalki is outgoing, loud, gregarious and 'bindaas'. Richa is quiet, withdrawn and repressed. One wants to live every moment. The other wants her life to end -- the sooner, the better.

Though the aggression between them is overdone, their initial bickering is well-scripted and gives away some of what the characters are holding back. The striking visuals help anchor the two protagonists' road journey. Very often, the film looks like a pretext for promoting Swedish tourism. But then debutant director Howard Rosemeyer has some surprises for the second half when the narrative sobers down to a treacly trickle of tears.

Despite its manipulative mould of getting our attention -- if one of the protagonists is dying and the other one just wants to die, then the audience is bound to get concerned -- the characters move us into believing in their grief and spurts of joy.

It's hard to imagine the film working without the Jias. Richa Chadha and Kalki Koechlin sneak a seductive synergy into the proceedings. They know they are playing 'sober' and 'bindaas' and they bring their most cherished acting chops into the picture. You will be thoroughly regaled by the two actresses, specially in the way they reverse gender biases.

Kalki openly lusts after Swedish men on the streets, the way a single Indian male would if he saw firangi women in a foreign town. The two girls sing raunchy songs, swig beer and swing together through some madcap adventures which don't always make sense.

A third interesting character, played by Kashmiri actor Arslan Goni, adds a bit more glint to this curiously quaint yet feisty and sexy road film which adds value to its zany touristic good-times-in-distant-lands theme with a sobering message on why life needs to be valued beyond the calamities that are bestowed on us.

Watch out for the sequence in a hospital bed where Kalki talks about her future and why she can't have it.

See the film for the Kalki-Richa jugal-bonding and yes, for the way the film uses the evergreen Shankar-Jaikishan/Lata Mangeshkar/Mohd Rafi song "Jiya oh jiya kuch bol do" to reiterate life's most valuable lessons.

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Jia Aur Jia Movie News

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Jia Aur Jia Synopsis

A story about two starkly different women (Richa Chadha and Kalki Koechlin) that share the same name. Together, they embark on a life-changing journey heading towards the same fate. The film is shot in Sweden.

A travelogue of two daughters of destiny who travelling the span of a foreign country, thousands of miles away from home, discovered that life no matter how short, can still be one big deal!

We have seen a million films in our cinema diaspora that describe the coming of age for boys going to men .JIA AUR JIA is the first bullseye attempt at telling the audiences what it is that brings girls to come of age to be women . While it is an absolute fun film written in the commercial mould, JIA AUR JIA is a film that asks pertinent questions, while fighting the high stakes of a magical journey called life.


'Jia Aur Jia': Lessons to learn (Review By Troy Ribeiro ;  Rating: **)

Debutant director Howard Rosemeyer's film, "Jia Aur Jia" has all the ingredients for a commercial film, but the mix is disproportionate. Between a road-movie and a chick-flick, the narrative traverses a bumpy path with a high dosage of emotional quotient.

The film is promising, but then the promise is shallow and vain. It is a tale of two "Jias" -- Jia Grewal (Kalki Koechlin) and Jia Venkatram (Richa Chadha) -- and it shows the contrasts in their perception of living their lives. Hence, the title "Jia Aur Jia" could loosely be translated into - 'live and lived'.

Used as metaphors, the bubbly Jia Grewal and the docile Jia Venkatram are two strangers who land up taking a budget trip inclusive of a road journey to Sweden. To simplify the confusion over their names during the holidays, Jia Grewal decides calling the other "Venkat", a short of her surname.

The duration of the trip is not revealed, so we are set for a happy-go-merry journey, where predictably the protagonists bond. And while they are bonding, it is revealed that like their characters, both have diametrically opposite objectives for this trip.

Unravelling of their objective is what keeps you glued to your seat, but in a rather tedious manner. That is because the film seems to have been inspired, intentionally or unintentionally, by other films.

Also, the writing is shallow and unconvincing. The plot is wrinkle free, switching moods violently.

The first half meanders aimlessly on an even keel, setting restlessness among the audience whereas the second half hooks you emotionally, albeit scarcely.

The dialogues, infused with filmy references are superficially dramatic making the entire procedure seem staged and unnatural. And the final message is far from being evocative.

While the characters are well-etched, the situations they are in seem to be one-dimensionally written, thereby marring their performances. Kalki's over-the-top act and Richa's forcefully understated performance, befit the characters they play. But they certainly seem out of tune with each other making their on-screen chemistry appear abnormal.

In his maiden appearance, Arslan Goni as Vasu is impressive and earnest. He has a fairly amiable screen presence, but his act fizzles out due to the poor writing and handling of his scenes.

Zarina Wahab as Jia Grewal's mother and Sudhanshu Pandey as Venkat's husband are flat characters and wasted.

On the technical front, with a shoe-string budget, the film has modest production values. The landscapes in Sweden are exploited with flourish but Shakil A. Khan's camerawork fails to elevate the viewing experience. While his frames are picture perfect, a few of the visuals are heavily pixilated.

The songs and the background score seamlessly mesh with the narrative but they do not add any sparkle.

Overall, this film befits for television viewing.

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Jia Aur Jia Songs

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